• Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans

    DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offsho...

    published: 15 Apr 2017
  • The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

    The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be gr...

    published: 23 Mar 2017
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

    published: 09 Jun 2017
  • Under Pressure - Deep Sea Minerals Resources

    Documentary examines the perspectives of different stakeholders involved with deep sea mineral resources in the Pacific.

    published: 11 Sep 2015
  • Deep-sea and seabed mineral resources research

    published: 23 Jun 2017
  • What Resources are in the Ocean?

    Ocean resources and human impacts

    published: 19 Sep 2016
  • How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?

    What can you do to make the oceans plastic-free? (HINT: Hitting the subscribe button uses zero plastic) ↓↓↓Check the resources below ↓↓↓ Ocean plastic pollution is a massive environmental problem. Millions of tons of plastic waste enter the ocean every year, even plastic that goes in the trash can often ends up in the sea! This week we learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and look at the dangers ocean plastic poses to ocean animals. Plus, a few tips for you to reduce your own plastic use! Plastic Oceans Foundation: http://www.plasticoceans.org/ United NationsClean Seas” program: http://www.cleanseas.org/ The 5 Gyres Institute: https://www.5gyres.org/ Lonely Whale Foundation: https://www.lonelywhale.org/ Take this quiz to learn about your plastic impact: https://www.nyti...

    published: 28 Mar 2017
  • Why The Ocean Is Responsible For All Human Life

    Check us out on iTunes! http://dne.ws/1NixUds Please Subscribe! http://testu.be/1FjtHn5 In 2013, Oceanographer David G. Gallo claimed that we had explored less than 10% of the planet. What have we discovered in the last 2 years? + + + + + + + + Previous Episode: How Much Life Do We Know Even Exists In The Ocean?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8sn7FTRXak&list=PLwwOk5fvpuuKAWK2Gjh9dL6CA7GDfHfg0&index=1 + + + + + + + + Sources: Hydrocarbons: http://noc.ac.uk/science-technology/marine-resources/energy/hydrocarbons “Natural oil and gas found in rocks beneath the seabed give us the fuel we need for cooking and heating in our homes, for power stations, motor vehicles and aeroplanes. Oil is also used to make all sorts of plastic products from bottles to mobile teleph...

    published: 02 Nov 2015
  • Scientists fear deep-sea mining

    Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.

    published: 06 Sep 2016
  • OceanMOOC | 1.2 | Our Ocean: a Finite Resource

    published: 15 May 2017
  • Ocean Resources

    Mr. Lima briefly discusses some of the resources that humans get out of the oceans including salt, water, power, petroleum, fishing, aquaculture, minerals-nodules, and tourism. Then he also mentions how we have polluted it and the danger it bodes for future generations.

    published: 02 Jan 2012
  • Overview on Deep Water Drilling

    Animation of deepwater drilling

    published: 30 Mar 2012
  • G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

    Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, Indi...

    published: 21 Feb 2015
  • Why We Know More About the Moon Than the Depths of the Ocean | Grace Young | TEDxOxford

    Grace C. Young is an ocean engineer, scientist, explorer, and aquanaut who spent an astounding 15 days living underwater as part of Mission 31 studying the mysterious ecosystems at the bottom of the sea while measuring the effects of climate change, acidification, and pollution. She describes her adventure, gives historical perspective to the disparity in funding between ocean and space research, and shares her thoughts on the future of marine exploration. In an era of urgent need yet limited public funding, she argues for a new international public-private partnership modelled after CERN to focus on filling the huge gaps in our knowledge of the oceans and developing ocean-saving technologies. You can learn more about Grace’s research on her blog: www.graceunderthesea.com/ Admitted to MIT...

    published: 15 Dec 2015
  • The Deep Sea - Top 10 Facts

    The deep sea is the largest habitat on the planet, taking up to 95% of the earth’s living space. Yet, the deep sea also the most unexplored environment, despite being one of the most amazing places on the planet. Throughout this video we’ll explain 10 amazing interesting facts about the deep sea. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Featuring…. Nobody knows where it begins - The ‘deep-sea’ is a contested term, lacking a single exact definition. For some it refers to the any part of the ocean where scary, odd and downright bizarre creatures live. For others, it’s a d...

    published: 08 Oct 2016
  • Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!

    Learn about the three ocean zones with our ocean experts, Dr. Irene Stanella and her lab assistants Wyatt and Ned! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow SOURCES: http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/science-for-kids-under-the-sea-ocean-bottle http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/light_travel.html http://www.nhptv.org/naturew...

    published: 09 Jun 2016
  • OceanMOOC | 5.4 | Seafloor Resources: Energy and Minerals

    published: 15 May 2017
  • OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

    published: 15 May 2017
  • OceanMOOC | 8.4 | Non-renewable Ocean Resources: From Exploration to Exploitation?

    published: 15 May 2017
  • Sea bed mining scraping the bottom of the barrel

    Out feature story this week takes us on a rather sobering underwater expedition into the dark world of seabed phosphate mining. The deep ocean floor, admittedly, is not a habitat we generally give much thought to. But in mankind’s quest for resources and mineral wealth, companies have now turned to this relatively unexplored region, and its phosphates they’re after, a resource in relatively limited supply on Earth. Is the supply of phosphates really so limited that it’s worth scraping our ocean bed completely bare? With our global seas, sea life and climate already in serious trouble, this action certainly seems like a bridge too far. Bertus went to see if he could get to the bottom of this matter.

    published: 18 Aug 2017
  • HOW DEEP IS OCEAN (HINDI) | समुन्द्र में कौन रहता है ??

    NAMASKAAR DOSTO, KAISE HAIN AAP LOG. THIS VIDEO IS ABOUT UNSEEN AND UNEXPLORED DEEP SEA. HAVE ADVENTURE. MOTIVATE US BY SUBSCRIBING OUR CHANNEL AND PRESS BELL ICON FOR OUR REGULAR VIDEOS. THANKYOU, BE HEALTY BE MOTIVATED. JAI HIND, STAY CONNECTED. This video was created with the single purpose to motivate people.For any query regarding contents, plz e-mail us at rebornmind123@gmail.com Music Source: Divider by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/divider/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/ "SOME IMAGES ARE USED AS ILLUSTRATIONS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE UNDER FAIR USE - All images and videos used are in Public Domain" INFO SOURCE : https://www.good.is/articles/deep-ocean-v...

    published: 28 May 2017
developed with YouTube
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe
2:33

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 46088
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush
23:43

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 54688
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans
2:32

DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:32
  • Updated: 15 Apr 2017
  • views: 460
videos
DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Destroying_The_Oceans
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
14:49

The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:49
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2017
  • views: 1367920
videos
The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/The_Deep_Ocean_Is_The_Final_Frontier_On_Planet_Earth
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier
4:29

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5951
videos
http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals
5:34

Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:34
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2017
  • views: 746
videos
https://wn.com/Exploration_Of_Deep_Sea_Minerals
Under Pressure - Deep Sea Minerals Resources
25:01

Under Pressure - Deep Sea Minerals Resources

  • Order:
  • Duration: 25:01
  • Updated: 11 Sep 2015
  • views: 416
videos
Documentary examines the perspectives of different stakeholders involved with deep sea mineral resources in the Pacific.
https://wn.com/Under_Pressure_Deep_Sea_Minerals_Resources
Deep-sea and seabed mineral resources research
1:42

Deep-sea and seabed mineral resources research

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  • Duration: 1:42
  • Updated: 23 Jun 2017
  • views: 114
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_And_Seabed_Mineral_Resources_Research
What Resources are in the Ocean?
8:20

What Resources are in the Ocean?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:20
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2016
  • views: 1831
videos
Ocean resources and human impacts
https://wn.com/What_Resources_Are_In_The_Ocean
How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?
5:00

How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:00
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2017
  • views: 611555
videos
What can you do to make the oceans plastic-free? (HINT: Hitting the subscribe button uses zero plastic) ↓↓↓Check the resources below ↓↓↓ Ocean plastic pollution is a massive environmental problem. Millions of tons of plastic waste enter the ocean every year, even plastic that goes in the trash can often ends up in the sea! This week we learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and look at the dangers ocean plastic poses to ocean animals. Plus, a few tips for you to reduce your own plastic use! Plastic Oceans Foundation: http://www.plasticoceans.org/ United NationsClean Seas” program: http://www.cleanseas.org/ The 5 Gyres Institute: https://www.5gyres.org/ Lonely Whale Foundation: https://www.lonelywhale.org/ Take this quiz to learn about your plastic impact: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/science/bottled-water-or-tap.html 10 ways to reduce plastic pollution: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/10-ways-reduce-plastic-pollution The no plastic straw pledge: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org/no-straw-please/ Ocean plastic pollution resources from Monterey Bay Aquarium: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/conservation-and-science/our-priorities/ocean-plastic-pollution What will it take to get plastic out of the ocean? https://ensia.com/features/what-will-it-take-to-get-plastics-out-of-the-ocean/ Resources for teachers: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/education/teacher-professional-development/ocean-plastic-pollution-summit ----------- REFERENCES: Cózar, Andrés, et al. "Plastic debris in the open ocean." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111.28 (2014): 10239-10244. Jamieson, Alan J., et al. "Bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in the deepest ocean fauna." Nature Ecology & Evolution 1 (2017): 0051. Jambeck, Jenna R., et al. "Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean." Science 347.6223 (2015): 768-771. “Moby-Duck” by Donovan Hohn (Harper’s Magazine) http://harpers.org/archive/2007/01/moby-duck/?single=1 ----------- FOLLOW US: Merch: https://store.dftba.com/collections/its-okay-to-be-smart Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Twitter: @okaytobesmart @DrJoeHanson Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Instagram: @DrJoeHanson Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Director: Joe Nicolosi Writer: Joe Hanson Producer/editor/animator: Andrew Matthews Producer: Stephanie Noone and Amanda Fox Produced by PBS Digital Studios Music via APM Stock images from Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com
https://wn.com/How_Much_Plastic_Is_In_The_Ocean
Why The Ocean Is Responsible For All Human Life
8:47

Why The Ocean Is Responsible For All Human Life

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:47
  • Updated: 02 Nov 2015
  • views: 28574
videos
Check us out on iTunes! http://dne.ws/1NixUds Please Subscribe! http://testu.be/1FjtHn5 In 2013, Oceanographer David G. Gallo claimed that we had explored less than 10% of the planet. What have we discovered in the last 2 years? + + + + + + + + Previous Episode: How Much Life Do We Know Even Exists In The Ocean?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8sn7FTRXak&list=PLwwOk5fvpuuKAWK2Gjh9dL6CA7GDfHfg0&index=1 + + + + + + + + Sources: Hydrocarbons: http://noc.ac.uk/science-technology/marine-resources/energy/hydrocarbons “Natural oil and gas found in rocks beneath the seabed give us the fuel we need for cooking and heating in our homes, for power stations, motor vehicles and aeroplanes. Oil is also used to make all sorts of plastic products from bottles to mobile telephones, and for chemicals used in factories and farming." Food: http://noc.ac.uk/science-technology/marine-resources/food “The seas and oceans contain vast natural resources that are increasingly available to humans as technology and scientific understanding improve. Humans have long exploited living resources such as fish and shellfish, often with devastating results as over-exploitation since the advent of industrialisation has decimated wild populations. Ocean Resources: http://marinebio.org/oceans/ocean-resources/ “The ocean is one of Earth's most valuable natural resources. It provides food in the form of fish and shellfish—about 200 billion pounds are caught each year. It's used for transportation—both travel and shipping." How Do We Use Marine Resources?: http://www.eu-hermione.net/learning/ocean-resources/63-how-do-we-use-marine-resources “For food - fish, such as orange roughy, blue ling, grenadier and redfish, and shellfish (e.g., oysters, mussels, crabs and lobsters) are in high demand by communities all over the world." Tidal Energy: http://noc.ac.uk/science-technology/marine-resources/energy/marine-renewables/tidal-energy “The large tides around the coast can be used to make electricity in two ways. The first, called tidal stream, uses the large current speeds that can occur in narrow channels and off headlands." + + + + + + + + TestTube Plus is built for enthusiastic science fans seeking out comprehensive conversations on the geeky topics they love. Host Trace Dominguez digs beyond the usual scope to deliver details, developments and opinions on advanced topics like AI, string theory and Mars exploration. TestTube Plus is also offered as an audio podcast on iTunes. + + + + + + + + Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/TraceDominguez TestTube on Facebook https://facebook.com/testtubenetwork TestTube on Google+ http://gplus.to/TestTube + + + + + + + +
https://wn.com/Why_The_Ocean_Is_Responsible_For_All_Human_Life
Scientists fear deep-sea mining
4:01

Scientists fear deep-sea mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:01
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2016
  • views: 5438
videos
Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
https://wn.com/Scientists_Fear_Deep_Sea_Mining
OceanMOOC | 1.2 | Our Ocean: a Finite Resource
8:45

OceanMOOC | 1.2 | Our Ocean: a Finite Resource

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:45
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 3302
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_1.2_|_Our_Ocean_A_Finite_Resource
Ocean Resources
15:06

Ocean Resources

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:06
  • Updated: 02 Jan 2012
  • views: 4450
videos
Mr. Lima briefly discusses some of the resources that humans get out of the oceans including salt, water, power, petroleum, fishing, aquaculture, minerals-nodules, and tourism. Then he also mentions how we have polluted it and the danger it bodes for future generations.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources
Overview on Deep Water Drilling
7:52

Overview on Deep Water Drilling

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  • Duration: 7:52
  • Updated: 30 Mar 2012
  • views: 1311637
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Animation of deepwater drilling
https://wn.com/Overview_On_Deep_Water_Drilling
G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules
31:13

G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

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  • Duration: 31:13
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2015
  • views: 204543
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Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, India’s exploration of PMN 12. UNCLOS- UN convention of Laws of the seas 13. Discussion of previous questions from UPSC Prelims Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
https://wn.com/G5_P1_Ocean_Resources,_Eez,_Petroleum_Reserves,_Polymetallic_Nodules
Why We Know More About the Moon Than the Depths of the Ocean | Grace Young | TEDxOxford
9:10

Why We Know More About the Moon Than the Depths of the Ocean | Grace Young | TEDxOxford

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  • Duration: 9:10
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2015
  • views: 4370
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Grace C. Young is an ocean engineer, scientist, explorer, and aquanaut who spent an astounding 15 days living underwater as part of Mission 31 studying the mysterious ecosystems at the bottom of the sea while measuring the effects of climate change, acidification, and pollution. She describes her adventure, gives historical perspective to the disparity in funding between ocean and space research, and shares her thoughts on the future of marine exploration. In an era of urgent need yet limited public funding, she argues for a new international public-private partnership modelled after CERN to focus on filling the huge gaps in our knowledge of the oceans and developing ocean-saving technologies. You can learn more about Grace’s research on her blog: www.graceunderthesea.com/ Admitted to MIT as a high school junior, Grace C. Young studied mechanical and ocean engineering with a focus on marine robotics, winning as a sophomore MIT’s Wallace Prize as its top ocean engineering undergraduate. In 2014 she was the youngest aquanaut on Mission 31, living underwater for 15 days. Currently she’s a Marshall Scholar and PhD candidate at Oxford University developing technology to help restore coral reefs degraded by climate change, acidification, overfishing, and pollution. She’s dedicated to developing technologies to explore and manage our oceans’ resources sustainably while preserving their fragile ecosystems. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/Why_We_Know_More_About_The_Moon_Than_The_Depths_Of_The_Ocean_|_Grace_Young_|_Tedxoxford
The Deep Sea - Top 10 Facts
11:10

The Deep Sea - Top 10 Facts

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  • Duration: 11:10
  • Updated: 08 Oct 2016
  • views: 189078
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The deep sea is the largest habitat on the planet, taking up to 95% of the earth’s living space. Yet, the deep sea also the most unexplored environment, despite being one of the most amazing places on the planet. Throughout this video we’ll explain 10 amazing interesting facts about the deep sea. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Featuring…. Nobody knows where it begins - The ‘deep-sea’ is a contested term, lacking a single exact definition. For some it refers to the any part of the ocean where scary, odd and downright bizarre creatures live. For others, it’s a descriptive definition of specific ocean depths. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04fay - Deep sea creatures are purposefully incredibly diverse. - Species from the deep may look like they’ve evolved in strange ways just to freak us out, but in fact they’ve evolved that way for specific survival purposes. For instance, to take advantage of the lack of light, most animals are transparent or red, a colour which few creatures can detect and is camouflaging in the darkness. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2h - Exploring the deep is tremendously testing - An obvious fact, but one you probably haven’t seriously thought about. Part of the reason why it’s taken us so long to explore is because only recently have we created new generations of incredibly sophisticated underwater vehicles that are able to venture so deep. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2i - Only three people have ever been to the deep sea - Due to the previously mentioned extremities, the deep sea may be the final frontier of exploration. Many more people have then been into space than to the deep sea. Like seriously, a loaaad more. Over 500 people have been into space, whereas only 3 people have ever ventured over 1000 fathoms into the depth of our oceans. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2j - New species are being discovered daily - Since it’s largely unexplored, each time a vehicle is sent into the deep, it’s highly likely to unearth a new discovery. Over a recent year-long period the World Register of Marine Species reported discovering 1451 new marine species, of which many were found to be from the deep sea. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2k - It’s a giant’s playground - The term Deep-sea gigantism exists in zoology for a reason. It refers to the tendency for deep-sea dwelling animals to be larger in size than their shallower-water relatives. We're not sure whether it comes about as a result of adaptation for scarce resources, greater pressure, or for other reasons. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2l - Some amazing ecosystems exist on the ocean floor - In 1977 a deep-sea research expedition made history as they found hydrothermal vents releasing mineral rich water at the bottom of the ocean. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2m - Geothermal vents aren’t the only thriving ecosystems on the ocean floor - Lush Deep-water coral gardens of various sizes, colours and shapes are able to survive in the Icy cold and extremely dim waters of up to 6000m (20,000 ft) below the ocean’s surface. In fact, scientists have discovered nearly as many species of deep-sea corals as shallow-water species. Unlike shallow-water corals, deep-sea corals don’t need sunlight but rather obtain the energy and nutrients they need to survive by trapping tiny organisms in passing currents. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2n - The deep-sea may solve many of our problems - Some organisms that live in deep-sea coral habitats and the deep sea in general produce chemicals with enormous potential for future medicinal or commercial products such as pharmaceuticals, enzymes, pesticides or cosmetics. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2o - The sea floor is a barren land - Put all your thoughts of geothermal vents and deep-sea coral reefs aside because the vast majority of the seafloor is featureless mud. On the face of it, it’s pretty similar to the empty expanses of outer space, but in space you can see everything using telescopes. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2p Music Credit: “Open Sea Morning” by Puddle of Infinity, From the Youtube Audio Library
https://wn.com/The_Deep_Sea_Top_10_Facts
Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!
3:41

Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!

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  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2016
  • views: 152446
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Learn about the three ocean zones with our ocean experts, Dr. Irene Stanella and her lab assistants Wyatt and Ned! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow SOURCES: http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/science-for-kids-under-the-sea-ocean-bottle http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/light_travel.html http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/nwep6c.htm License Links Anglerfish: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Humpback_anglerfish.png Seal: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Monachus_schauinslandi.jpg Shrimp: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heterocarpus_ensifer.jpg Hatchetfish: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Argyropelecus_aculeatus.jpg
https://wn.com/Let's_Learn_The_Ocean_Zones
OceanMOOC | 5.4 | Seafloor Resources: Energy and Minerals
16:09

OceanMOOC | 5.4 | Seafloor Resources: Energy and Minerals

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  • Duration: 16:09
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 794
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https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_5.4_|_Seafloor_Resources_Energy_And_Minerals
OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources
7:07

OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

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  • Duration: 7:07
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 621
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https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_5.6_|_Ocean_Exploration_And_Sustainable_Use_Of_Marine_Resources
OceanMOOC | 8.4 | Non-renewable Ocean Resources: From Exploration to Exploitation?
10:38

OceanMOOC | 8.4 | Non-renewable Ocean Resources: From Exploration to Exploitation?

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  • Duration: 10:38
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 703
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https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_8.4_|_Non_Renewable_Ocean_Resources_From_Exploration_To_Exploitation
Sea bed mining  scraping the bottom of the barrel
14:48

Sea bed mining scraping the bottom of the barrel

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  • Duration: 14:48
  • Updated: 18 Aug 2017
  • views: 207
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Out feature story this week takes us on a rather sobering underwater expedition into the dark world of seabed phosphate mining. The deep ocean floor, admittedly, is not a habitat we generally give much thought to. But in mankind’s quest for resources and mineral wealth, companies have now turned to this relatively unexplored region, and its phosphates they’re after, a resource in relatively limited supply on Earth. Is the supply of phosphates really so limited that it’s worth scraping our ocean bed completely bare? With our global seas, sea life and climate already in serious trouble, this action certainly seems like a bridge too far. Bertus went to see if he could get to the bottom of this matter.
https://wn.com/Sea_Bed_Mining_Scraping_The_Bottom_Of_The_Barrel
HOW DEEP IS OCEAN (HINDI) | समुन्द्र में कौन रहता है ??
6:50

HOW DEEP IS OCEAN (HINDI) | समुन्द्र में कौन रहता है ??

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  • Duration: 6:50
  • Updated: 28 May 2017
  • views: 616835
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NAMASKAAR DOSTO, KAISE HAIN AAP LOG. THIS VIDEO IS ABOUT UNSEEN AND UNEXPLORED DEEP SEA. HAVE ADVENTURE. MOTIVATE US BY SUBSCRIBING OUR CHANNEL AND PRESS BELL ICON FOR OUR REGULAR VIDEOS. THANKYOU, BE HEALTY BE MOTIVATED. JAI HIND, STAY CONNECTED. This video was created with the single purpose to motivate people.For any query regarding contents, plz e-mail us at rebornmind123@gmail.com Music Source: Divider by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/divider/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/ "SOME IMAGES ARE USED AS ILLUSTRATIONS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE UNDER FAIR USE - All images and videos used are in Public Domain" INFO SOURCE : https://www.good.is/articles/deep-ocean-video 1)This video has no negative impact on the original works (It would actually be positive for them) 2)This video is also for teaching purposes. 3)It is not transformative in nature. 4)I only used bits and pieces of videos to get the point across where necessary. Disclaimer- Some contents are used for educational purpose under fair use. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit,educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
https://wn.com/How_Deep_Is_Ocean_(Hindi)_|_समुन्द्र_में_कौन_रहता_है