• TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans

    DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offsho...

    published: 15 Apr 2017
  • The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

    The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be gr...

    published: 23 Mar 2017
  • G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

    Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, Indi...

    published: 21 Feb 2015
  • Ocean Resources

    Mr. Lima briefly discusses some of the resources that humans get out of the oceans including salt, water, power, petroleum, fishing, aquaculture, minerals-nodules, and tourism. Then he also mentions how we have polluted it and the danger it bodes for future generations.

    published: 02 Jan 2012
  • Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

    published: 09 Jun 2017
  • How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

    Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far ric...

    published: 07 Jun 2014
  • The Deep Sea - Top 10 Facts

    The deep sea is the largest habitat on the planet, taking up to 95% of the earth’s living space. Yet, the deep sea also the most unexplored environment, despite being one of the most amazing places on the planet. Throughout this video we’ll explain 10 amazing interesting facts about the deep sea. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Featuring…. Nobody knows where it begins - The ‘deep-sea’ is a contested term, lacking a single exact definition. For some it refers to the any part of the ocean where scary, odd and downright bizarre creatures live. For others, it’s a d...

    published: 08 Oct 2016
  • Deep-sea and seabed mineral resources research

    published: 23 Jun 2017
  • What Resources are in the Ocean?

    Ocean resources and human impacts

    published: 19 Sep 2016
  • OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

    published: 15 May 2017
  • Global Cooling Resource: Deep Ocean Water

    DOW or Deep Ocean Water has the potential to help solve global warming. Since tchnologies employing DOW have effluents that are colder than the atmosphere, they cool the atmosphere. In Deep Ocean Water, we examine the purity, temperature, air conditioning, and renewable energy applications of DOW. Narrated by John Craven PhD, intrepid oceanographer and inventor. With botanist - oceanographer-explorer Sylvia Earle.

    published: 13 Sep 2007
  • OceanMOOC | 5.4 | Seafloor Resources: Energy and Minerals

    published: 15 May 2017
  • Ocean Resources Notes

    description

    published: 16 Nov 2013
  • Deep Ocean 16x FPS Pack Release

    Did you enjoy the video? Why not give it a like! 👍 ─────────────────────────────── ▼ Texture Pack Download ♛ Download Link: ‪ http://bit.ly/DeepOcean16x ─────────────────────────────── ▼ Info ♛ Server IP: - eu.badlion.net / hypixel.net /eu.pvplounge.net ♛ Intro: - (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDUqgTW93N8) ♛ Skin: - https://twitter.com/ArcanXIV ──────────────────────────────── ▼ Social Links ♛ Twitter: http://bit.ly/NotroDanTwitter ♛ Twitch: http://bit.ly/NotroDanTwitch ♛ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NotroDanSubscribe ♛ NameMC: http://bit.ly/NotroDanNameMC ──────────────────────────────── ♛ Minecraft IGN : NotroDan ──────────────────────────────── ▶ Song: Luke Christopher - Bridges (feat. Siena Streiber) ──────────────────────────────── I do not own the music used in this video

    published: 04 Apr 2017
  • Employing high-technology solutions to manage ocean resources | Jim Leape

    From climate change to overfishing and pollution with plastics, oceans are under stress as never before. Jim Leape, a Professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Sciences, discusses how technologies such as satellites and oceangoing drones are being used to improve ocean management. http://www.weforum.org/

    published: 26 Jul 2017
  • What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

    Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future...

    published: 12 Feb 2018
  • Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

    We're depleting many of our land-based stores of minerals, and remote though it is, the bottom of the ocean is a likelier source of precious minerals than asteroids. It is strewn with deposits rich in gold, copper, manganese, cobalt, and other resources that supply our electronics, green technology, and other vital tools like medical imaging machines. Since no one has tried mining the seafloor yet, much remains uncertain about how it will work — or how much it will disturb the creatures that make their homes at the bottom of the ocean. http://www.nbcnews.com/mach/innovation/these-fearsome-robots-will-bring-mining-deep-ocean-n724901?cid=public-rss_20170227 http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com

    published: 27 Feb 2017
  • on ocean resources

    Gregorio "Kilili" Camacho Sablan shares his perspective on pressing issues affecting the CNMI. Learn more at www.kilili08.com.

    published: 30 Sep 2008
  • CREEPY SKELETON of the DEEP OCEAN! - Subnautica Full Release Gameplay

    Welcome to Subnautica 1.0! Subnautica Full Release is finally here! Let's begin a new Subnautica series by jumping into the ocean and surviving wild ocean fish and dangers! ► Join Blitz on Discord: http://discord.gg/YTBlitz - - - - - Subnautica Full Release Gameplay Overview: Subnautica is an open world, underwater exploration and adventure game currently under construction at Unknown Worlds. The game is in advanced stage of Early Access development, with substantial content available for play. Performance/frame-rates, stability, and polish are not yet up to the standards of a finished game. Dive Into a Vast Underwater World You have crash-landed on alien ocean world, and the only way to go is down. Subnautica's oceans range from sun drenched shallow coral reefs to treacherous deep-sea...

    published: 12 Feb 2018
  • Resources From The Ocean | Rubio's

    Rubios has quite a history with the ocean. As a means of inspiration, a place of origin, and a resource that makes everything we do possible. So raise a glass with us, please: to the ocean. Learn more at: https://www.rubios.com/ocean-goodness A healthy ocean is an important inspiration to everything we do at Rubio’s Coastal Grill. The resources from the ocean has helped us out along our entire journey, which is why we strive to help the ocean in any way we can.

    published: 30 Jan 2015
  • Ocean Resources

    Video to go with the Ocean Resources Notes

    published: 06 Mar 2015
developed with YouTube
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 33118
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 37572
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5886
videos
http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans

DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:32
  • Updated: 15 Apr 2017
  • views: 274
videos
DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Destroying_The_Oceans
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:49
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2017
  • views: 791698
videos
The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/The_Deep_Ocean_Is_The_Final_Frontier_On_Planet_Earth
G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:13
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2015
  • views: 179829
videos
Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, India’s exploration of PMN 12. UNCLOS- UN convention of Laws of the seas 13. Discussion of previous questions from UPSC Prelims Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
https://wn.com/G5_P1_Ocean_Resources,_Eez,_Petroleum_Reserves,_Polymetallic_Nodules
Ocean Resources

Ocean Resources

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:06
  • Updated: 02 Jan 2012
  • views: 4090
videos
Mr. Lima briefly discusses some of the resources that humans get out of the oceans including salt, water, power, petroleum, fishing, aquaculture, minerals-nodules, and tourism. Then he also mentions how we have polluted it and the danger it bodes for future generations.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources
Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:34
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2017
  • views: 175
videos
https://wn.com/Exploration_Of_Deep_Sea_Minerals
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2014
  • views: 24746
videos
Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release.
https://wn.com/How_A_Canadian_Company_Will_Mine_The_Sea_Bed_Near_Papua_New_Guinea
The Deep Sea - Top 10 Facts

The Deep Sea - Top 10 Facts

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:10
  • Updated: 08 Oct 2016
  • views: 144761
videos
The deep sea is the largest habitat on the planet, taking up to 95% of the earth’s living space. Yet, the deep sea also the most unexplored environment, despite being one of the most amazing places on the planet. Throughout this video we’ll explain 10 amazing interesting facts about the deep sea. Subscribe for more! ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Featuring…. Nobody knows where it begins - The ‘deep-sea’ is a contested term, lacking a single exact definition. For some it refers to the any part of the ocean where scary, odd and downright bizarre creatures live. For others, it’s a descriptive definition of specific ocean depths. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04fay - Deep sea creatures are purposefully incredibly diverse. - Species from the deep may look like they’ve evolved in strange ways just to freak us out, but in fact they’ve evolved that way for specific survival purposes. For instance, to take advantage of the lack of light, most animals are transparent or red, a colour which few creatures can detect and is camouflaging in the darkness. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2h - Exploring the deep is tremendously testing - An obvious fact, but one you probably haven’t seriously thought about. Part of the reason why it’s taken us so long to explore is because only recently have we created new generations of incredibly sophisticated underwater vehicles that are able to venture so deep. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2i - Only three people have ever been to the deep sea - Due to the previously mentioned extremities, the deep sea may be the final frontier of exploration. Many more people have then been into space than to the deep sea. Like seriously, a loaaad more. Over 500 people have been into space, whereas only 3 people have ever ventured over 1000 fathoms into the depth of our oceans. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2j - New species are being discovered daily - Since it’s largely unexplored, each time a vehicle is sent into the deep, it’s highly likely to unearth a new discovery. Over a recent year-long period the World Register of Marine Species reported discovering 1451 new marine species, of which many were found to be from the deep sea. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2k - It’s a giant’s playground - The term Deep-sea gigantism exists in zoology for a reason. It refers to the tendency for deep-sea dwelling animals to be larger in size than their shallower-water relatives. We're not sure whether it comes about as a result of adaptation for scarce resources, greater pressure, or for other reasons. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2l - Some amazing ecosystems exist on the ocean floor - In 1977 a deep-sea research expedition made history as they found hydrothermal vents releasing mineral rich water at the bottom of the ocean. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2m - Geothermal vents aren’t the only thriving ecosystems on the ocean floor - Lush Deep-water coral gardens of various sizes, colours and shapes are able to survive in the Icy cold and extremely dim waters of up to 6000m (20,000 ft) below the ocean’s surface. In fact, scientists have discovered nearly as many species of deep-sea corals as shallow-water species. Unlike shallow-water corals, deep-sea corals don’t need sunlight but rather obtain the energy and nutrients they need to survive by trapping tiny organisms in passing currents. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2n - The deep-sea may solve many of our problems - Some organisms that live in deep-sea coral habitats and the deep sea in general produce chemicals with enormous potential for future medicinal or commercial products such as pharmaceuticals, enzymes, pesticides or cosmetics. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2o - The sea floor is a barren land - Put all your thoughts of geothermal vents and deep-sea coral reefs aside because the vast majority of the seafloor is featureless mud. On the face of it, it’s pretty similar to the empty expanses of outer space, but in space you can see everything using telescopes. Credit: http://linkbun.ch/04f2p Music Credit: “Open Sea Morning” by Puddle of Infinity, From the Youtube Audio Library
https://wn.com/The_Deep_Sea_Top_10_Facts
Deep-sea and seabed mineral resources research

Deep-sea and seabed mineral resources research

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:42
  • Updated: 23 Jun 2017
  • views: 58
videos
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_And_Seabed_Mineral_Resources_Research
What Resources are in the Ocean?

What Resources are in the Ocean?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:20
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2016
  • views: 1295
videos
Ocean resources and human impacts
https://wn.com/What_Resources_Are_In_The_Ocean
OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:07
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 506
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_5.6_|_Ocean_Exploration_And_Sustainable_Use_Of_Marine_Resources
Global Cooling Resource: Deep Ocean Water

Global Cooling Resource: Deep Ocean Water

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:51
  • Updated: 13 Sep 2007
  • views: 6244
videos
DOW or Deep Ocean Water has the potential to help solve global warming. Since tchnologies employing DOW have effluents that are colder than the atmosphere, they cool the atmosphere. In Deep Ocean Water, we examine the purity, temperature, air conditioning, and renewable energy applications of DOW. Narrated by John Craven PhD, intrepid oceanographer and inventor. With botanist - oceanographer-explorer Sylvia Earle.
https://wn.com/Global_Cooling_Resource_Deep_Ocean_Water
OceanMOOC | 5.4 | Seafloor Resources: Energy and Minerals

OceanMOOC | 5.4 | Seafloor Resources: Energy and Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:09
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 730
videos
https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_5.4_|_Seafloor_Resources_Energy_And_Minerals
Ocean Resources Notes

Ocean Resources Notes

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:02
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2013
  • views: 2278
videos
description
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources_Notes
Deep Ocean 16x FPS Pack Release

Deep Ocean 16x FPS Pack Release

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:27
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2017
  • views: 65103
videos
Did you enjoy the video? Why not give it a like! 👍 ─────────────────────────────── ▼ Texture Pack Download ♛ Download Link: ‪ http://bit.ly/DeepOcean16x ─────────────────────────────── ▼ Info ♛ Server IP: - eu.badlion.net / hypixel.net /eu.pvplounge.net ♛ Intro: - (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDUqgTW93N8) ♛ Skin: - https://twitter.com/ArcanXIV ──────────────────────────────── ▼ Social Links ♛ Twitter: http://bit.ly/NotroDanTwitter ♛ Twitch: http://bit.ly/NotroDanTwitch ♛ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NotroDanSubscribe ♛ NameMC: http://bit.ly/NotroDanNameMC ──────────────────────────────── ♛ Minecraft IGN : NotroDan ──────────────────────────────── ▶ Song: Luke Christopher - Bridges (feat. Siena Streiber) ──────────────────────────────── I do not own the music used in this video
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_16X_Fps_Pack_Release
Employing high-technology solutions to manage ocean resources | Jim Leape

Employing high-technology solutions to manage ocean resources | Jim Leape

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:14
  • Updated: 26 Jul 2017
  • views: 238
videos
From climate change to overfishing and pollution with plastics, oceans are under stress as never before. Jim Leape, a Professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Sciences, discusses how technologies such as satellites and oceangoing drones are being used to improve ocean management. http://www.weforum.org/
https://wn.com/Employing_High_Technology_Solutions_To_Manage_Ocean_Resources_|_Jim_Leape
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:45
  • Updated: 12 Feb 2018
  • views: 5
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reyman, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage Commissioned by TBA21 - Academy. FB: TBA21–Academy @TBA.Academy Instagram: @tba21academy web: www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
https://wn.com/What_Is_Deep_Sea_Mining_A_Web_Series._Episode_1_Tools_For_Ocean_Literacy
Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:34
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2017
  • views: 386
videos
We're depleting many of our land-based stores of minerals, and remote though it is, the bottom of the ocean is a likelier source of precious minerals than asteroids. It is strewn with deposits rich in gold, copper, manganese, cobalt, and other resources that supply our electronics, green technology, and other vital tools like medical imaging machines. Since no one has tried mining the seafloor yet, much remains uncertain about how it will work — or how much it will disturb the creatures that make their homes at the bottom of the ocean. http://www.nbcnews.com/mach/innovation/these-fearsome-robots-will-bring-mining-deep-ocean-n724901?cid=public-rss_20170227 http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_Just_Around_The_Corner
on ocean resources

on ocean resources

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:45
  • Updated: 30 Sep 2008
  • views: 98
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Gregorio "Kilili" Camacho Sablan shares his perspective on pressing issues affecting the CNMI. Learn more at www.kilili08.com.
https://wn.com/On_Ocean_Resources
CREEPY SKELETON of the DEEP OCEAN! - Subnautica Full Release Gameplay

CREEPY SKELETON of the DEEP OCEAN! - Subnautica Full Release Gameplay

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  • Duration: 30:14
  • Updated: 12 Feb 2018
  • views: 378
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Welcome to Subnautica 1.0! Subnautica Full Release is finally here! Let's begin a new Subnautica series by jumping into the ocean and surviving wild ocean fish and dangers! ► Join Blitz on Discord: http://discord.gg/YTBlitz - - - - - Subnautica Full Release Gameplay Overview: Subnautica is an open world, underwater exploration and adventure game currently under construction at Unknown Worlds. The game is in advanced stage of Early Access development, with substantial content available for play. Performance/frame-rates, stability, and polish are not yet up to the standards of a finished game. Dive Into a Vast Underwater World You have crash-landed on alien ocean world, and the only way to go is down. Subnautica's oceans range from sun drenched shallow coral reefs to treacherous deep-sea trenches, lava fields, and bio-luminescent underwater rivers. Manage your oxygen supply as you explore kelp forests, plateaus, reefs, and winding cave systems. The water teems with life: Some of it helpful, much of it harmful. Scavenge, Craft, and Survive After crash landing in your Life Pod, the clock is ticking to find water, food, and to develop the equipment you need to explore. Collect resources from the ocean around you. Craft knives, lights, diving gear, and personal water craft. Venture deeper and further form to find rarer resources, allowing you to craft more advanced items. Construct Underwater Habitats Build bases on the sea floor. Choose layouts and components, and manage hull-integrity as depth and pressure increase. Use your base to store resources, park vehicles, and replenish oxygen supplies as you explore the vast ocean. Unravel the Mystery What happened to this planet? Signs abound that something is not right. What caused you to crash? What is infecting the sea life? Who built the mysterious structures scattered around the ocean? Can you find a way to make it off the planet alive? Disrupt the Food Chain The ocean teems with life: Use the ecosystem to help you. Lure and distract a threatening creature with a fresh fish, or simply swim as fast as you can to avoid gnashing jaws of roaming predators. Handle the Pressure Build a Pressure Re-Active Waterproof Nanosuit, or PRAWN Suit, and explore extreme depth and heat. Modify the suit with mining drills, torpedo launchers, propulsion cannons, grappling hooks and more. Fear the Night As the sun goes down, the predators come out. The ocean is unforgiving of those caught unprepared in the darkness. Areas that are safe to explore during the day become treacherous at night, but also reveal a beauty that those who hide from the darkness will never see. Dive Below the Ocean Floor Cave systems wind below the sea bed, from dark claustrophobic passages to caverns lit by bio-luminescent life and burning-hot lava flows. Explore the world below the ocean floor, but watch your oxygen levels, and take care to avoid the threats lurking in the darkness. - - - - - Download Subnautica on Steam: http://bit.ly/2mYpb8x - - - - - Q. What is a supported video? A. Due to FTC rules, all videos where I have received a free download, merchandise, or any travel arrangements is supported by the developers. Q. What is a sponsored video? A. Due to FTC rules, all videos where I have received financial incentives to produce a video need to be disclosed. I will (and have been) disclosing these as sponsored. - - - - - Want more Blitz? Check these links out: Subscribe: http://bit.ly/Sub2Blitz Twitter: https://twitter.com/Blitzkriegsler Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/blitz Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/user/ytblitz discord: http://discord.gg/YTBlitz
https://wn.com/Creepy_Skeleton_Of_The_Deep_Ocean_Subnautica_Full_Release_Gameplay
Resources From The Ocean | Rubio's

Resources From The Ocean | Rubio's

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01
  • Updated: 30 Jan 2015
  • views: 5764
videos
Rubios has quite a history with the ocean. As a means of inspiration, a place of origin, and a resource that makes everything we do possible. So raise a glass with us, please: to the ocean. Learn more at: https://www.rubios.com/ocean-goodness A healthy ocean is an important inspiration to everything we do at Rubio’s Coastal Grill. The resources from the ocean has helped us out along our entire journey, which is why we strive to help the ocean in any way we can.
https://wn.com/Resources_From_The_Ocean_|_Rubio's
Ocean Resources

Ocean Resources

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:04
  • Updated: 06 Mar 2015
  • views: 1504
videos
Video to go with the Ocean Resources Notes
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources