• TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

    The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be gr...

    published: 23 Mar 2017
  • What Do We Really Know About The Ocean Floor?

    Check us out on iTunes! http://dne.ws/1NixUds Please Subscribe! http://testu.be/1FjtHn5 In 2013, Oceanographer David G. Gallo claimed that we had explored less than 10% of the planet. What have we discovered in the last 2 years? + + + + + + + + Previous Episode: How Much Life Do We Know Even Exists In The Ocean?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8sn7FTRXak&list=PLwwOk5fvpuuKAWK2Gjh9dL6CA7GDfHfg0&index=1 + + + + + + + + Sources: Unfathomable: How Much We Don’t Know About The Ocean: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/06/unfathomable-how-much-we-dont-know-about-the-ocean/277328/ “Oceanographer David G. Gallo notes that we've explored less than 10 percent of this planet -- perhaps less than 5 percent -- and that astonishing things lurk down in the bo...

    published: 01 Nov 2015
  • G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

    Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, Indi...

    published: 21 Feb 2015
  • The Future of Ocean Exploration

    The amazing future of oceanographic discovery, featuring biofluorescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, ROV's (remote operated vehicles), and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: Timelapse (TDC Remix): MotionArray.com Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod: Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400021 Consequence: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Hydra (TDC Remix): YT Audio Library The Stranger (Glimpse): https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Dark Night by Matt Stewart Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Featured videos...

    published: 13 Jul 2017
  • Global Cooling Resource: Deep Ocean Water

    DOW or Deep Ocean Water has the potential to help solve global warming. Since tchnologies employing DOW have effluents that are colder than the atmosphere, they cool the atmosphere. In Deep Ocean Water, we examine the purity, temperature, air conditioning, and renewable energy applications of DOW. Narrated by John Craven PhD, intrepid oceanographer and inventor. With botanist - oceanographer-explorer Sylvia Earle.

    published: 13 Sep 2007
  • How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?

    What can you do to make the oceans plastic-free? (HINT: Hitting the subscribe button uses zero plastic) ↓↓↓Check the resources below ↓↓↓ Ocean plastic pollution is a massive environmental problem. Millions of tons of plastic waste enter the ocean every year, even plastic that goes in the trash can often ends up in the sea! This week we learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and look at the dangers ocean plastic poses to ocean animals. Plus, a few tips for you to reduce your own plastic use! Plastic Oceans Foundation: http://www.plasticoceans.org/ United NationsClean Seas” program: http://www.cleanseas.org/ The 5 Gyres Institute: https://www.5gyres.org/ Lonely Whale Foundation: https://www.lonelywhale.org/ Take this quiz to learn about your plastic impact: https://www.nyti...

    published: 28 Mar 2017
  • Ocean Resources

    Mr. Lima briefly discusses some of the resources that humans get out of the oceans including salt, water, power, petroleum, fishing, aquaculture, minerals-nodules, and tourism. Then he also mentions how we have polluted it and the danger it bodes for future generations.

    published: 02 Jan 2012
  • Richard Branson : The future of the Deep Ocean is Ours to decide

    published: 07 Oct 2013
  • Why Ocean Exploration Matters: You Have to Look in Order to Find

    We know so little about our deep ocean. What if the unexplored deep holds the cures to diseases, new energy resources, sources of food? How will we know if we aren't even looking? Check out some other reasons that ocean exploration matters: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/world-oceans-day/index.html. [Video: This octopus was seen floating along during a dive on April 6, 2012, in the Gulf of Mexico off NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. On this particular dive, in the midst of an expansive bed of chemosynthetic mussels, scientists were able to find an active gas seep that had been imaged earlier using the ship's multibeam system. This discovery verified the use of high-resolution multibeam as a viable tool for locating gas seeps and added another exploration tool to our arsenal. Video courtesy ...

    published: 12 Jun 2014
  • Solomon Islands Coral Reef in 4K

    Coral reefs are diverse underwater ecosystems held together by calcium carbonate structures secreted by corals. Coral reefs are built by colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few nutrients. Most coral reefs are built from stony corals, which in turn consist of polyps that cluster in groups. The polyps belong to a group of animals known as Cnidaria, which also includes sea anemones and jellyfish. Unlike sea anemones, corals secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which support and protect the coral polyps. Most reefs grow best in warm, shallow, clear, sunny and agitated waters. Often called "rainforests of the sea", shallow coral reefs form some of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. They occupy less than 0.1% of the world's ocean surface, about half the area of France...

    published: 29 Oct 2016
  • Ocean Resources Notes

    description

    published: 16 Nov 2013
  • Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

    We're depleting many of our land-based stores of minerals, and remote though it is, the bottom of the ocean is a likelier source of precious minerals than asteroids. It is strewn with deposits rich in gold, copper, manganese, cobalt, and other resources that supply our electronics, green technology, and other vital tools like medical imaging machines. Since no one has tried mining the seafloor yet, much remains uncertain about how it will work — or how much it will disturb the creatures that make their homes at the bottom of the ocean. http://www.nbcnews.com/mach/innovation/these-fearsome-robots-will-bring-mining-deep-ocean-n724901?cid=public-rss_20170227 http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com

    published: 27 Feb 2017
  • OceanMOOC | 8.4 | Non-renewable Ocean Resources: From Exploration to Exploitation?

    published: 15 May 2017
  • What Resources are in the Ocean?

    Ocean resources and human impacts

    published: 19 Sep 2016
  • Ocean Resources: New Opportunties, New Threats

    California & The Future of Environmental Law & Policy Ocean Resources: New Opportunties, New Threats (co-sponsored by UC Berkeley's Law of the Sea Institute) Drew Bohan, Executive Officer, California Ocean Protection Council, Sacramento, CA Kathryn Mengerink, Director, Ocean Program, Environmental Law Institute, La Jolla, CA Joel Reynolds, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council, Los Angeles, CA Harry Scheiber, Stefan A. Riesenfeld Professor of Law and History; Director, Institute for Legal Research; Director, Sho Sato Program in Japanese and U.S. Law; Co-director, Law of the Sea Institute, University of California Berkeley http://ccelp.berkeley.edu

    published: 17 Apr 2008
  • Weird Humming Sound Detected in the Dark Depths of the Ocean

    www.undergroundworldnews.com The deep sea is a forbidding place, inhabited by strange, monstrous creatures that haunt its pitch-black waters. Now researchers have discovered an eerie new attribute of this little-known region: a subtle low humming sound that emanates from its depths every day around dawn and dusk. “It’s not that loud, it sounds like a buzzing or humming, and that goes on for an hour to two hours, depending on the day,” said Simone Baumann-Pickering, co-author of the study, in a statement. The source of the hum remains a mystery, to say the least. Researchers suspect that it may be coming from an organism, or perhaps many organisms chanting in unison, but no known marine creature could be matched to the noise. It might be coming from a species yet to be identified, or it mi...

    published: 26 Feb 2016
  • Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

    Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf

    published: 21 Apr 2017
  • Ocean Resources

    Video to go with the Ocean Resources Notes

    published: 06 Mar 2015
  • OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

    published: 15 May 2017
  • Protecting Our Living Ocean Resources

    (Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) The Protected Resources Division of NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center conducts research on marine mammals and turtles in all oceans of the world. Join Division Director Lisa Ballance as she describes the research and programs that are informing how we can protect and sustain some of our most precious ocean resources. Series: "Perspectives on Ocean Science" [7/2013] [Science] [Show ID: 24912]

    published: 03 Jul 2013
  • Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!

    Learn about the three ocean zones with our ocean experts, Dr. Irene Stanella and her lab assistants Wyatt and Ned! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow SOURCES: http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/science-for-kids-under-the-sea-ocean-bottle http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/light_travel.html http://www.nhptv.org/naturew...

    published: 09 Jun 2016
developed with YouTube
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 19079
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5801
videos
http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 29376
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:49
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2017
  • views: 305123
videos
The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/The_Deep_Ocean_Is_The_Final_Frontier_On_Planet_Earth
What Do We Really Know About The Ocean Floor?

What Do We Really Know About The Ocean Floor?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:49
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2015
  • views: 54199
videos
Check us out on iTunes! http://dne.ws/1NixUds Please Subscribe! http://testu.be/1FjtHn5 In 2013, Oceanographer David G. Gallo claimed that we had explored less than 10% of the planet. What have we discovered in the last 2 years? + + + + + + + + Previous Episode: How Much Life Do We Know Even Exists In The Ocean?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8sn7FTRXak&list=PLwwOk5fvpuuKAWK2Gjh9dL6CA7GDfHfg0&index=1 + + + + + + + + Sources: Unfathomable: How Much We Don’t Know About The Ocean: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/06/unfathomable-how-much-we-dont-know-about-the-ocean/277328/ “Oceanographer David G. Gallo notes that we've explored less than 10 percent of this planet -- perhaps less than 5 percent -- and that astonishing things lurk down in the bottom most depths of the ocean." FY 2016 Budget Activity: http://research.noaa.gov/AboutUs/OurBudget.aspx “On June 11, the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations passed the Commerce-Justice-Science (CJS) bill through Committee. The Senate bill has yet to be debated on the Senate floor, where it could be amended." Fiscal Year 2015: Budget Estimates: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/FY15_Summary_Brief.pdf “Provides the necessary resources to advance the Nation’s bipartisan space exploration plan and ensure that the United States remains the world's leader in space exploration and scientific discovery for years to come." NOAA Releases New Views Of Earth’s Ocean Floor: http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2012/20120416_bathymetry.html “NOAA has made sea floor maps and other data on the world’s coasts, continental shelves and deep ocean available for easy viewing online." National Centers For Environmental Information: (Interactive Bathymetric Data Viewer) http://maps.ngdc.noaa.gov/viewers/bathymetry/ Big Data Maps World’s Ocean Floor: http://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2015/08/10/big-data-maps-world-s-ocean-floor.html “Scientists from the University of Sydney’s School of Geosciences have led the creation of the world’s first digital map of the seafloor’s geology." Big Data Maps World’s Ocean Floor: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150810110911.htm “Scientists from the University of Sydney's School of Geosciences have led the creation of the world's first digital map of the seafloor's geology." + + + + + + + + TestTube Plus is built for enthusiastic science fans seeking out comprehensive conversations on the geeky topics they love. Host Trace Dominguez digs beyond the usual scope to deliver details, developments and opinions on advanced topics like AI, string theory and Mars exploration. TestTube Plus is also offered as an audio podcast on iTunes. + + + + + + + + Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/TraceDominguez TestTube on Facebook https://facebook.com/testtubenetwork TestTube on Google+ http://gplus.to/TestTube + + + + + + + +
https://wn.com/What_Do_We_Really_Know_About_The_Ocean_Floor
G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:13
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2015
  • views: 156159
videos
Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, India’s exploration of PMN 12. UNCLOS- UN convention of Laws of the seas 13. Discussion of previous questions from UPSC Prelims Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
https://wn.com/G5_P1_Ocean_Resources,_Eez,_Petroleum_Reserves,_Polymetallic_Nodules
The Future of Ocean Exploration

The Future of Ocean Exploration

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:26
  • Updated: 13 Jul 2017
  • views: 16365
videos
The amazing future of oceanographic discovery, featuring biofluorescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, ROV's (remote operated vehicles), and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: Timelapse (TDC Remix): MotionArray.com Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod: Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400021 Consequence: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Hydra (TDC Remix): YT Audio Library The Stranger (Glimpse): https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Dark Night by Matt Stewart Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Featured videos: Mining: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/video/2017/jun/28/robots-ocean-floor-deep-sea-mining-video Sonar mapping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRQuID0IwbY Microbes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uktdKw_bJ_8 Biofluorescence: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/david-gruber/ Susan Avery TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQIgKyX3oU Triona McGrath TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJPpJhQxaLw Robert Ballard's EV Nautilus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOIOXvU0_qk James Cameron's Deepsea Challenger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSfESqX-E84 Wired's profile on HOV's vs ROV's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUzz_ilsFa0 Onboard the Okeanos Explorer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0G68ORc8uQ With 95% of the ocean floor unexplored, the deep sea is Earth’s last frontier. Its pioneers are scientists leveraging the latest technology to cast light on the massive and incomprehensibly dark environment that extends more than 35,000 feet down. Until recently, this world was known only to our planet’s most unearthly species. This is the story of our largest biome—and the people devoting themselves to understanding it and saving it for future generations. 40 years ago we discovered hydrothermal vents, which act as Earth's plumbing system, transporting chemicals and extreme heat from the molten core of our planet, helping to regulate the chemical makeup of the oceans. But this seemingly toxic environment is still home to life. Organisms that don’t need photosynthesis to survive can live down here. And with most of the seafloor left to explore, many species remain undiscovered. Studying these unlikely ecosystems can teach us about the earliest stages of life’s evolution here on Earth, and about the possibility of life on other planets. That’s why NASA is working with oceanographers to help plan the mission to explore Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. And because these vents form in active volcanic zones, they also help us better understand how land forms and moves over time. Plus, the sludge that’s constantly spewing from the vents contains some of the most valuable metals known to man. [Guardian video journalist] “In the deep ocean, where the water is as dark as ink, lie riches that no treasure hunters have managed to retrieve. They are deposits of precious minerals, from cobalt to gold, that have tantalized miners and nations for decades...” In 2019, a Canadian company will make the first-ever attempt at extracting these minerals. Using the latest technologies and massive, custom designed vehicles, it aims to bring up $1.5 billion worth of metals from a single site 25km off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Nautilus says it will minimize environmental damage by using infrared cameras and sonar to pinpoint the exact location of ore deposits, allowing it to shred less of the ocean floor. But environmentalists aren’t buying it. Preserving a sensitive ecosystem 8,000 feet underwater from the impact of mining is just not that simple. Unfortunately, we may not have much choice. There’s growing demand for these metals, but dwindling supplies of them on land. Cobalt — for instance — is used in jet engines, lithium ion batteries, and the computer or smartphone you’re watching this video on—and the machines we made it on. But this age-old clash between miners and environment is really just one chapter in a much larger story of technology development—innovations aimed at maintaining the delicate balance of the increasingly threatened ocean ecosystem. One such tool is the EK80 broadband acoustic echo sounder. It uses a range of frequencies to paint a much more comprehensive picture of the amount and types of species living in a selected area of water.
https://wn.com/The_Future_Of_Ocean_Exploration
Global Cooling Resource: Deep Ocean Water

Global Cooling Resource: Deep Ocean Water

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  • Duration: 3:51
  • Updated: 13 Sep 2007
  • views: 6235
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DOW or Deep Ocean Water has the potential to help solve global warming. Since tchnologies employing DOW have effluents that are colder than the atmosphere, they cool the atmosphere. In Deep Ocean Water, we examine the purity, temperature, air conditioning, and renewable energy applications of DOW. Narrated by John Craven PhD, intrepid oceanographer and inventor. With botanist - oceanographer-explorer Sylvia Earle.
https://wn.com/Global_Cooling_Resource_Deep_Ocean_Water
How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?

How Much Plastic is in the Ocean?

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  • Duration: 5:00
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2017
  • views: 386136
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What can you do to make the oceans plastic-free? (HINT: Hitting the subscribe button uses zero plastic) ↓↓↓Check the resources below ↓↓↓ Ocean plastic pollution is a massive environmental problem. Millions of tons of plastic waste enter the ocean every year, even plastic that goes in the trash can often ends up in the sea! This week we learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and look at the dangers ocean plastic poses to ocean animals. Plus, a few tips for you to reduce your own plastic use! Plastic Oceans Foundation: http://www.plasticoceans.org/ United NationsClean Seas” program: http://www.cleanseas.org/ The 5 Gyres Institute: https://www.5gyres.org/ Lonely Whale Foundation: https://www.lonelywhale.org/ Take this quiz to learn about your plastic impact: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/science/bottled-water-or-tap.html 10 ways to reduce plastic pollution: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/10-ways-reduce-plastic-pollution The no plastic straw pledge: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org/no-straw-please/ Ocean plastic pollution resources from Monterey Bay Aquarium: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/conservation-and-science/our-priorities/ocean-plastic-pollution What will it take to get plastic out of the ocean? https://ensia.com/features/what-will-it-take-to-get-plastics-out-of-the-ocean/ Resources for teachers: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/education/teacher-professional-development/ocean-plastic-pollution-summit ----------- REFERENCES: Cózar, Andrés, et al. "Plastic debris in the open ocean." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111.28 (2014): 10239-10244. Jamieson, Alan J., et al. "Bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in the deepest ocean fauna." Nature Ecology & Evolution 1 (2017): 0051. Jambeck, Jenna R., et al. "Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean." Science 347.6223 (2015): 768-771. “Moby-Duck” by Donovan Hohn (Harper’s Magazine) http://harpers.org/archive/2007/01/moby-duck/?single=1 ----------- FOLLOW US: Merch: https://store.dftba.com/collections/its-okay-to-be-smart Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Twitter: @okaytobesmart @DrJoeHanson Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Instagram: @DrJoeHanson Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Director: Joe Nicolosi Writer: Joe Hanson Producer/editor/animator: Andrew Matthews Producer: Stephanie Noone and Amanda Fox Produced by PBS Digital Studios Music via APM Stock images from Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com
https://wn.com/How_Much_Plastic_Is_In_The_Ocean
Ocean Resources

Ocean Resources

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  • Duration: 15:06
  • Updated: 02 Jan 2012
  • views: 3737
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Mr. Lima briefly discusses some of the resources that humans get out of the oceans including salt, water, power, petroleum, fishing, aquaculture, minerals-nodules, and tourism. Then he also mentions how we have polluted it and the danger it bodes for future generations.
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources
Richard Branson : The future of the Deep Ocean is Ours to decide

Richard Branson : The future of the Deep Ocean is Ours to decide

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  • Duration: 3:46
  • Updated: 07 Oct 2013
  • views: 2407
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https://wn.com/Richard_Branson_The_Future_Of_The_Deep_Ocean_Is_Ours_To_Decide
Why Ocean Exploration Matters: You Have to Look in Order to Find

Why Ocean Exploration Matters: You Have to Look in Order to Find

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  • Duration: 0:37
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2014
  • views: 1367
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We know so little about our deep ocean. What if the unexplored deep holds the cures to diseases, new energy resources, sources of food? How will we know if we aren't even looking? Check out some other reasons that ocean exploration matters: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/world-oceans-day/index.html. [Video: This octopus was seen floating along during a dive on April 6, 2012, in the Gulf of Mexico off NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. On this particular dive, in the midst of an expansive bed of chemosynthetic mussels, scientists were able to find an active gas seep that had been imaged earlier using the ship's multibeam system. This discovery verified the use of high-resolution multibeam as a viable tool for locating gas seeps and added another exploration tool to our arsenal. Video courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Gulf of Mexico 2012.]
https://wn.com/Why_Ocean_Exploration_Matters_You_Have_To_Look_In_Order_To_Find
Solomon Islands Coral Reef in 4K

Solomon Islands Coral Reef in 4K

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  • Duration: 14:18
  • Updated: 29 Oct 2016
  • views: 64681
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Coral reefs are diverse underwater ecosystems held together by calcium carbonate structures secreted by corals. Coral reefs are built by colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few nutrients. Most coral reefs are built from stony corals, which in turn consist of polyps that cluster in groups. The polyps belong to a group of animals known as Cnidaria, which also includes sea anemones and jellyfish. Unlike sea anemones, corals secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which support and protect the coral polyps. Most reefs grow best in warm, shallow, clear, sunny and agitated waters. Often called "rainforests of the sea", shallow coral reefs form some of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. They occupy less than 0.1% of the world's ocean surface, about half the area of France, yet they provide a home for at least 25% of all marine species, including fish, mollusks, worms, crustaceans, echinoderms, sponges, tunicates and other cnidarians. Paradoxically, coral reefs flourish even though they are surrounded by ocean waters that provide few nutrients. They are most commonly found at shallow depths in tropical waters, but deep water and cold water corals also exist on smaller scales in other areas. Coral reefs deliver ecosystem services to tourism, fisheries and shoreline protection. The annual global economic value of coral reefs is estimated between US$29.8-375 billion. However, coral reefs are fragile ecosystems, partly because they are very sensitive to water temperature. They are under threat from climate change, oceanic acidification, blast fishing, cyanide fishing for aquarium fish, sunscreen use, overuse of reef resources, and harmful land-use practices, including urban and agricultural runoff and water pollution, which can harm reefs by encouraging excess algal growth I Don't See the Branches, I See the Leaves di Chris Zabriskie è un brano autorizzato da Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Fonte: http://chriszabriskie.com/dtv/ Artista: http://chriszabriskie.com/
https://wn.com/Solomon_Islands_Coral_Reef_In_4K
Ocean Resources Notes

Ocean Resources Notes

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  • Duration: 12:02
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2013
  • views: 2088
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description
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources_Notes
Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

Deep Ocean Mining Just Around The Corner

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  • Duration: 0:34
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2017
  • views: 256
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We're depleting many of our land-based stores of minerals, and remote though it is, the bottom of the ocean is a likelier source of precious minerals than asteroids. It is strewn with deposits rich in gold, copper, manganese, cobalt, and other resources that supply our electronics, green technology, and other vital tools like medical imaging machines. Since no one has tried mining the seafloor yet, much remains uncertain about how it will work — or how much it will disturb the creatures that make their homes at the bottom of the ocean. http://www.nbcnews.com/mach/innovation/these-fearsome-robots-will-bring-mining-deep-ocean-n724901?cid=public-rss_20170227 http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_Just_Around_The_Corner
OceanMOOC | 8.4 | Non-renewable Ocean Resources: From Exploration to Exploitation?

OceanMOOC | 8.4 | Non-renewable Ocean Resources: From Exploration to Exploitation?

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  • Duration: 10:38
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 527
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https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_8.4_|_Non_Renewable_Ocean_Resources_From_Exploration_To_Exploitation
What Resources are in the Ocean?

What Resources are in the Ocean?

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  • Duration: 8:20
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2016
  • views: 875
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Ocean resources and human impacts
https://wn.com/What_Resources_Are_In_The_Ocean
Ocean Resources: New Opportunties, New Threats

Ocean Resources: New Opportunties, New Threats

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  • Duration: 1:17:38
  • Updated: 17 Apr 2008
  • views: 1035
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California & The Future of Environmental Law & Policy Ocean Resources: New Opportunties, New Threats (co-sponsored by UC Berkeley's Law of the Sea Institute) Drew Bohan, Executive Officer, California Ocean Protection Council, Sacramento, CA Kathryn Mengerink, Director, Ocean Program, Environmental Law Institute, La Jolla, CA Joel Reynolds, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council, Los Angeles, CA Harry Scheiber, Stefan A. Riesenfeld Professor of Law and History; Director, Institute for Legal Research; Director, Sho Sato Program in Japanese and U.S. Law; Co-director, Law of the Sea Institute, University of California Berkeley http://ccelp.berkeley.edu
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources_New_Opportunties,_New_Threats
Weird Humming Sound Detected in the Dark Depths of the Ocean

Weird Humming Sound Detected in the Dark Depths of the Ocean

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  • Duration: 3:09
  • Updated: 26 Feb 2016
  • views: 37509
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www.undergroundworldnews.com The deep sea is a forbidding place, inhabited by strange, monstrous creatures that haunt its pitch-black waters. Now researchers have discovered an eerie new attribute of this little-known region: a subtle low humming sound that emanates from its depths every day around dawn and dusk. “It’s not that loud, it sounds like a buzzing or humming, and that goes on for an hour to two hours, depending on the day,” said Simone Baumann-Pickering, co-author of the study, in a statement. The source of the hum remains a mystery, to say the least. Researchers suspect that it may be coming from an organism, or perhaps many organisms chanting in unison, but no known marine creature could be matched to the noise. It might be coming from a species yet to be identified, or it might be evidence of a new capability of an already-known creature. Then again, it might be coming from a non-living source too. There's one clue, however. The sound comes from the ocean's mesopelagic zone, a region between 660 to 3,300 feet below the surface that's too dark for photosynthesis to occur. Since food is scarce there, many of the bizarre organisms that call this region home must migrate up and down the water column en masse on a daily basis to feed. These migrations typically happen at dawn and dusk, which coincides with the weird humming sound. Learn More: http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/stories/mysterious-humming-sound-detected-deep-ocean
https://wn.com/Weird_Humming_Sound_Detected_In_The_Dark_Depths_Of_The_Ocean
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!

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  • Duration: 3:36
  • Updated: 21 Apr 2017
  • views: 4878
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Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Leave_My_Down_Below_Alone
Ocean Resources

Ocean Resources

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  • Duration: 3:04
  • Updated: 06 Mar 2015
  • views: 1284
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Video to go with the Ocean Resources Notes
https://wn.com/Ocean_Resources
OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

OceanMOOC | 5.6 | Ocean Exploration and Sustainable Use of Marine Resources

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  • Duration: 7:07
  • Updated: 15 May 2017
  • views: 432
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https://wn.com/Oceanmooc_|_5.6_|_Ocean_Exploration_And_Sustainable_Use_Of_Marine_Resources
Protecting Our Living Ocean Resources

Protecting Our Living Ocean Resources

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  • Duration: 57:55
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2013
  • views: 1344
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) The Protected Resources Division of NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center conducts research on marine mammals and turtles in all oceans of the world. Join Division Director Lisa Ballance as she describes the research and programs that are informing how we can protect and sustain some of our most precious ocean resources. Series: "Perspectives on Ocean Science" [7/2013] [Science] [Show ID: 24912]
https://wn.com/Protecting_Our_Living_Ocean_Resources
Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!

Let's Learn the Ocean Zones!

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  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2016
  • views: 99846
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Learn about the three ocean zones with our ocean experts, Dr. Irene Stanella and her lab assistants Wyatt and Ned! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow SOURCES: http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/science-for-kids-under-the-sea-ocean-bottle http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/light_travel.html http://www.nhptv.org/natureworks/nwep6c.htm License Links Anglerfish: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Humpback_anglerfish.png Seal: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Monachus_schauinslandi.jpg Shrimp: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heterocarpus_ensifer.jpg Hatchetfish: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Argyropelecus_aculeatus.jpg
https://wn.com/Let's_Learn_The_Ocean_Zones